A recent presentation to nutritionists at the North Dakota Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics (NDAND) Virtual Symposium & Expo 2021, held March 11-12, highlighted the benefits of protein as part of a healthy adult diet. Sherri Stastny, PhD, RD, CSSD, LRD, Professor in the Department of Health, Nutrition and Exercise Sciences at North Dakota State University (NDSU), presented at the recent symposium that “higher protein intake is linked to improved body composition in women “Was open to registered dietitians, diet students, nurses, nurses, certified nutrition managers, and other allied health professionals.

Stastny’s presentation is based on a recent research study by NDSU researchers that looked at how consuming animal protein like beef can affect muscle performance in adults. The research, which took place between 2016 and 2018, was funded by the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association as the contractor of the Beef Checkoff. the Minnesota Beef Council; and with longstanding support from the North Dakota Beef Commission (NDBC).

Stastny’s presentation highlighted the strong theoretical relationship between dietary protein intake and muscle quality, and focused on protein quality, when protein was consumed during the day and at what point in life, and key sources of protein / nutrient density Food plus the NDSU study. “Already at the age of 40 to 50 we lose strength and muscle mass very slowly, but unfortunately every year. Our study has shown that animal protein intake has a positive influence on the strength and endurance of the upper and lower body, ”says Stastny. “Major sources of high-protein animal-based foods that contain more needed proteins include lean beef and pork, low-fat milk and yogurt, whey protein drinks, and other foods vital to maintaining functional skills such as walking and restraint.” are up and down from a chair. Adding enough nutritious protein foods to our diets can slow muscle loss as we get older. ”

“This study and its results are very important to support and share our message of the importance of beef as part of a healthy, balanced diet,” said Nancy Jo Bateman, Managing Director of NDBC. “Our state’s checkoff dollars were used to support research done in North Dakota that has a truly national impact. Not only is this important to consumers, but it is something that the beef producers in our state who pay the beef checkoff must be very proud of. ”

The NDBC, which represents beef farmers and ranchers in North Dakota, administers the state beef checkoff program with the aim of increasing demand for beef by building consumer confidence and exceeding consumer expectations. This is achieved through programs and activities in the fields of advertising, research and consumer information. Learn more at www.ndbeef.org.